Cosplay. Voice Acting. Food. Designer & Creator. And a dash of my life. Hope to see you around~ c:

Warrior of Light WIP! Today I did make up and wig fitting in helmet. The latter felt tight, but my awesome slave- er, friend Ian will be able to fix that aahahahah. Glad the contacts feel comfortable even with make up on. The wig is obviously unstyled, but will be more spikey in the way it is shown now. I hope this will be epic. I hope.

Will debut at Otakon 2014 for our Dissidia Final Fantasy Group.

Helmet made by my friend Ian

Couple of weeks ago I went to California and was able to visit Chinatown, where my dad and his sisters grew up. Surprisingly, my Grandma was able to remember working for a Bakery shop she was employed at over 70 years ago! They are celebrating their 75th Anniversary this year, so the cakes had to be good (and yes they were : D). I only took a few pics, but the experience was truly heartwarming and meaningful to my family culture.

RIP Maya Angelou


When we come to it
We, this people, on this minuscule and kithless globe
Who reach daily for the bomb, the blade and the dagger
Yet who petition in the dark for tokens of peace
We, this people on this mote of matter
In whose mouths abide cankerous words
Which challenge our very existence
Yet out of those same mouths
Come songs of such exquisite sweetness
That the heart falters in its labor
And the body is quieted into awe

We, this people, on this small and drifting planet
Whose hands can strike with such abandon
That in a twinkling, life is sapped from the living
Yet those same hands can touch with such healing, irresistible tenderness
That the haughty neck is happy to bow
And the proud back is glad to bend
Out of such chaos, of such contradiction
We learn that we are neither devils nor divines

When we come to it
We, this people, on this wayward, floating body
Created on this earth, of this earth
Have the power to fashion for this earth
A climate where every man and every woman
Can live freely without sanctimonious piety
Without crippling fear

When we come to it
We must confess that we are the possible
We are the miraculous, the true wonder of this world
That is when, and only when
We come to it.

-A Brave and Startling Truth

Reblogged from girlinshiningarmor  1,638 notes

"He who touches it will have whatever he desires granted… That is what you said, is it not, Ganondorf?  Gods of the Triforce!  Hear that I which desire!  Hope!  I desire hope for these children!  Give them a future!  Wash away this ancient land of Hyrule!  Let a ray of light shine on the future of this world!

Reblogged from weareallmixedup  198 notes
pag-asaharibon:

Actress Chloe Bennet says changing her name changed her luck


Chloe Wang’s fortunes in Hollywood improved dramatically when she decided to change her surname.


She says within days of adopting her father’s given name — Bennet — as a family name, she landed her first big acting gig.


That was on the TV series Nashville, in a recurring role as record company assistant Hailey.


“I was having trouble booking things with my last name. I think it was hard for people to cast me as an ethnic, as an Asian American woman,” says Bennet in an interview with the Star. “But I still wanted to keep my dad’s name, and I wanted to respect him, so I used his first name.”


The Chicago-born Bennet became one of the breakout stars of the current TV season, playing computer hacker Skye on Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., the number one new series on Canadian television. Her role is also central to the first season, as the show has unveiled more of her origins each week leading up to a May 13 finale.


But her experience as an actress of colour — her father is ethnically Chinese and her mother is Caucasian — isn’t new. Actors and actresses have been changing their names since the dawn of the industry. After all, it’s arguable whether Bernard Schwartz would have made it in the movie business if he hadn’t changed his name to Tony Curtis. Closer to home, British Columbia-raised actress Meg Tilley (Bomb Girls) changed her name from Chan because of fears of racism growing up.


Still, things are shifting in the industry: two prime time series have women of colour in their leads — Kerry Washington in Scandal and Lucy Liu in Elementary.


In the Marvel production, Bennet shares air time with Ming-Na Wen (ER) who plays a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and the show is co-produced by Maurissa Tancharoen, who is of Thai ethnicity.


“It’s been great to be a part of a show which is groundbreaking in terms of being an American woman and being Asian on television because there’s people who don’t see a lot of that and I’m really proud of it,” says Bennet.


Marvel has had something of a reboot in the second half of the season after it didn’t live up to critical expectations. But it has remained popular, and among the top five most watched shows in Canada. The retooling meant the series is a little tougher-minded, and less obviously a production from ABC’s corporate parent Disney.


As the show heads into the finale, S.H.I.E.L. D is in disarray and arch enemy HYDRA has been resurrected.


Skye’s character and origins are also central to the theme of the show, as she is on a journey to discover who her parents really are. Born in a Chinese village in Hunan province, the entire village was killed defending her when she was an infant. She was subsequently sent to a series of orphanages and foster homes. Another key thematic thread in the show is finding out whether she may possess a super power. She is also the central love interest, playing off against agent Grant Ward (Brett Dalton) in a game of deception.


“The show is getting a little bit darker, it’s a little edgier and you’ll see that as we progress it will be crazy,” says Bennet. “Skye finds out a lot about her family coming up, or lack thereof. She doesn’t know where she’s from or if she’s human, or alien, if she has powers. She has no idea, so we’ll be seeing a lot of her finding that out.”


Growing up in Chicago, Bennet joined the Second City youth ensemble at age 12, studying improv.


Several years later she was signed by a music management company and moved to China, where she lived with her grandmother.


She lived in Shanghai for almost two years and released a debut single “Uh Oh” in Mandarin and in English.


“I studied Mandarin everyday. I really never spoke it before I went over there and I kind of became relatively fluent and I’ve actually lost pretty much all of it since then,” she says. “But it was an incredible experience.”


Her fan base has exploded exponentially from her music days.


“When we do go out, and we run into fans, it’s really great. I’m just as excited to see them and it’s really been a pretty incredible, fantastic ride into this Marvel universe.”

pag-asaharibon:

Actress Chloe Bennet says changing her name changed her luck

Chloe Wang’s fortunes in Hollywood improved dramatically when she decided to change her surname.

She says within days of adopting her father’s given name — Bennet — as a family name, she landed her first big acting gig.

That was on the TV series Nashville, in a recurring role as record company assistant Hailey.

“I was having trouble booking things with my last name. I think it was hard for people to cast me as an ethnic, as an Asian American woman,” says Bennet in an interview with the Star. “But I still wanted to keep my dad’s name, and I wanted to respect him, so I used his first name.”

The Chicago-born Bennet became one of the breakout stars of the current TV season, playing computer hacker Skye on Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., the number one new series on Canadian television. Her role is also central to the first season, as the show has unveiled more of her origins each week leading up to a May 13 finale.

But her experience as an actress of colour — her father is ethnically Chinese and her mother is Caucasian — isn’t new. Actors and actresses have been changing their names since the dawn of the industry. After all, it’s arguable whether Bernard Schwartz would have made it in the movie business if he hadn’t changed his name to Tony Curtis. Closer to home, British Columbia-raised actress Meg Tilley (Bomb Girls) changed her name from Chan because of fears of racism growing up.

Still, things are shifting in the industry: two prime time series have women of colour in their leads — Kerry Washington in Scandal and Lucy Liu in Elementary.

In the Marvel production, Bennet shares air time with Ming-Na Wen (ER) who plays a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and the show is co-produced by Maurissa Tancharoen, who is of Thai ethnicity.

“It’s been great to be a part of a show which is groundbreaking in terms of being an American woman and being Asian on television because there’s people who don’t see a lot of that and I’m really proud of it,” says Bennet.

Marvel has had something of a reboot in the second half of the season after it didn’t live up to critical expectations. But it has remained popular, and among the top five most watched shows in Canada. The retooling meant the series is a little tougher-minded, and less obviously a production from ABC’s corporate parent Disney.

As the show heads into the finale, S.H.I.E.L. D is in disarray and arch enemy HYDRA has been resurrected.

Skye’s character and origins are also central to the theme of the show, as she is on a journey to discover who her parents really are. Born in a Chinese village in Hunan province, the entire village was killed defending her when she was an infant. She was subsequently sent to a series of orphanages and foster homes. Another key thematic thread in the show is finding out whether she may possess a super power. She is also the central love interest, playing off against agent Grant Ward (Brett Dalton) in a game of deception.

“The show is getting a little bit darker, it’s a little edgier and you’ll see that as we progress it will be crazy,” says Bennet. “Skye finds out a lot about her family coming up, or lack thereof. She doesn’t know where she’s from or if she’s human, or alien, if she has powers. She has no idea, so we’ll be seeing a lot of her finding that out.”

Growing up in Chicago, Bennet joined the Second City youth ensemble at age 12, studying improv.

Several years later she was signed by a music management company and moved to China, where she lived with her grandmother.

She lived in Shanghai for almost two years and released a debut single “Uh Oh” in Mandarin and in English.

“I studied Mandarin everyday. I really never spoke it before I went over there and I kind of became relatively fluent and I’ve actually lost pretty much all of it since then,” she says. “But it was an incredible experience.”

Her fan base has exploded exponentially from her music days.

“When we do go out, and we run into fans, it’s really great. I’m just as excited to see them and it’s really been a pretty incredible, fantastic ride into this Marvel universe.”